Slave Pianos, ¡¡Emancipate the Dissonance!!, Poster

SLAVE PIANOS

¡¡EMANCIPATE THE DISSONANCE!!

aba’+c

Danius Kesminas + Michael Stevenson
Neil Kelly + Rohan Drape

Lombard-Freid Fine Arts [project space]
470 Broome Street
New York 10013
phone 212 334 5060
fax 212 334 5263

2 - 10 December 1999

exposition/recitals of artists’ music and sound works + aba’+c [a series of 3 performances from the slave repertiore]

Thursday December 2 [opening]

a Slave Chamber: menage a quatre

FLUX Quartet peform:

  • Bill VIOLA buried secrets 1995
  • SOLVER 3 1997
  • Kurt Merz SCHWITTERS ursonate 1922–32
  • the GOBBLER lazy siren 1998
  • Martin KIPPENBERGER new york - auschwitz 1996
  • Christian MARCLAY one thousand cycles 1981
  • Marcel DUCHAMP musical erratum 1913

FLUX Quartet are:

  • violin Tom Chiu
  • violin Cornelius Dufallo
  • viola Kenji Bunch
  • cello Darrett Adkins

Saturday December 4

b Anti-Jazz: the vibrational liquid of improvisation

  • Dieter ROTH der akkordeon fluch 1981–82
  • Hany ARMANIOUS/D M THOMAS november 1996
  • Louise BOURGEOIS otte 1995
  • John NIXON alexander boch 1981
  • Thomas LAWSON untitled
  • Lauire ANDERSON

the Anti-Jazz Bentet are:

  • slave piano Barney McAll [in absentia]
  • guitar Ben Mondir
  • bass Ron McLure
  • drums Pheroan Ak-Laff

Thursday December 9

a’ Caged/Uncaged: let the music free

  • Jean Tinguely
  • Rohan Drape
  • A R Penck afrika paranoia
  • Mike Kelley
  • Stephen Prina

followed by [closing party] +c

DJ Spooky cutting breaks from the slave pianos archive

exposition hours:

  • Thursday Dec 2
  • Friday Dec 3
  • Saturday Dec 4
  • Wednesday Dec 8
  • Thursday Dec 9

commence at 8pm
all performances are free

slave pianos tour is supported by the International Export & Touring Program of Arts Victoria

Slave Pianos, ¡¡Emancipate the Dissonance!!, Poster

004-045

Slave Pianos, The Broccoli Maestro, Poster

016-006

Slave Pianos, The Strange Voyage of Bas Jan Ader, Poster

017-015

Slave Pianos, Two Lives in Flux: And Vice Versa, Poster

020-002

A3 Poster

029-030

The Lepidopters: Part I

035-036

The Lepidopters: Part II

035-100

The Lepidopters: Part III

035-112

The Lepidopters: Part III (B)

035-113

Slave Pianos, The Lepidopters, Poster

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Slave Pianos, The Lepidopters, Poster

035-126

Slave Pianos, An Evening With Slave Pianos, Press Release

DARREN KNIGHT GALLERY
840 ELIZABETH ST WATERLOO NSW 2017 SYDNEY AUSTRALIA
TELEPHONE +61 2 9699 5353 FACSIMILE +61 2 9699 5254
email dmknight@ozemail.com.au

Darren Knight and lovers present an evening with SLAVE PIANOS
Drinks and matinee performance from 4 pm Saturday 15 May
ADAWO plays from 7.30 pm
Lovers – 1/108 Moor Street, Fitzroy. Tel. 03 9417 0057
Exhibition continues to 23 May, 1999.

SLAVE PIANOS is a collaborative venture undertaken by Danius Kesminas and Michael Stevenson in partnership with musical composers Neil Kelly and Rohan Drape. The two artists have worked closely with the composers in realising this project which seeks to document the history and practice of sound art. In particular SLAVE PIANOS concentrates on the music of artists who are known predominantly in the field of the visual arts.

SLAVE PIANOS is a study of the musical works of visual artists using the field of ethno-musicology. The process has been to recompose, arrange and transcribe the original recordings of artists music and score them for piano. The scores have been produced and compiled by Neil Kelly & Rohan Drape along with Stuart Campbell and pianist Barney McAll.

SLAVE PIANOS has also published the musical scores in the form of sheet music. At exhibition a full repertoire of sheet music accompanies the performance of the SLAVE PIANO itself, a player piano which mechanically reproduces the compositions.

Visual artists included in the SLAVE PIANOS repertoire are; Hany Armanious, Joseph Beuys, George Brecht, Louise Bourgeois, L. Budd, Tony Clark, Martin Creed, Joan Dubuffet, Katharina Fritsch, Marco Fusinato, Martin Kersels, Thomas Lawson, Bruce McLean, Daniel Malone, Nam June Palk, Martin Popperwell, John Nixon, Dieter Roth, Ross Sinclair, Ricky Swallow, David M Thomas, John Tinguely, Peter Tyndall & Ronnie van Hout

As part of a world tour which has already included the Museum Fridericianum (Kassel, Germany) and Stills Gallery (Edinburgh, Scotland), Kesminas and Stevenson present An Evening with SLAVE PIANOS at Lovers 1/108 Moor Street, Fitzroy.

The exhibition of sheet music and a matinee performance by the SLAVE Piano will begin at 4pm Saturday 15 May.

At 7.30 pm the same evening the Lovers loading bay will host the first live performance of ADAWO, Australia’s only Martin Creed tribute band. This English artist has made numerous forays into the musical domain and is included in the SLAVE PIANOS repertoire. Creed also performs in the art rock band OWADA. Martin Creed and OWADA performed at last years Sydney Biennial. As a rival event, ADAWOS performance has been timed to coincide with the opening of the Melbourne International Biennial. The band will perform covers of original OWADA tunes.

ADAWO are; Jon Campbell (vocals), Crab Fermanis (guitar), Dave O’Brien (bass) and Tom Zdanius (drums).

This performance will celebrate the launch of the SLAVE PIANOS CD which will be available on the night ($30).

After the Melbourne performance, SLAVE PIANOS will be exhibited in Auckland (Auckland Art Gallery, May/June 1999), Sydney (Darren Knight Gallery, August 1999), New York (Lombard/Freid Fine Arts) and Los Angeles (China Art Objects Gallery). SLAVE PIANOS tour is supported by the International Export and Touring Program of Arts Victoria.

SLAVE PIANOS would like to thank the La Trobe Music Department

Slave Pianos, An Evening With Slave Pianos, Press Release

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Slave Pianos, ¡¡Emancipate the Dissonance!!, Press Release

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Slave Pianos, ¡¡Emancipate the Dissonance!!, Press Release

Slave Pianos
127 Charles St Abbotsford, Vic, 3067
Phone: –613–9419 0206
Fax: –613–96392641

LOMBARD-FREID FINE ARTS present the New York Premiere of

SLAVE PIANOS ¡¡EMANCIPATE THE DISSONANCE!! : a, b, a’+c

exposition and recitals of visual artists’ music and sound works
[a series of 3 performances from the slave repertoire]

at:

Lombard-Freid Projects
470 Broome Street
2nd Floor
New York 10013
Phone 212 334 5060
2 - 5 December 1999

SLAVE PIANOS is a project initiated by Australian artists Michael Stevenson and Danius Kesminas. It has grown out of their common interest in the history and practice of visual artists working with sound. The project is a collaborative undertaking with Australian composers Neil Kelly and Rohan Drape and pianist Barney McAll.

SLAVE PIANOS seeks to broaden the knowledge, appreciation and understanding of sound works created by persons who are predominantly known in the field of the visual arts. Stevenson and Kesminas have used the practice of ethnomusicology to collate the SLAVE ARCHIVE, an expanding audio library of sound works by sculptors, painters etc. Original recordings from the SLAVE ARCHIVE have been recomposed, arranged and transcribed for Slave Piano by Kelly, Drape and McAll. The New York exposition consists of a series of installations and performances featuring the Slave Piano - a computer controlled mechanical piano player at a Steinway grand. The piano in recital creates, as it were, a trace back to the original recording and a portrait of the original artists’ performance.

The apotheosis of the grand piano within modern and contemporary art/music practices is at the center of the SLAVE PIANOS philosophy. Recently in Australia the particularly colonial obsession with this instrument has been highlighted through films such as Jane Campion’s ‘The Piano’, the David Helfgott story as portrayed in ‘Shine’ and ‘Passion’ , about Australia’s most innovative 20th century composer, Percy Grainger.

The Slave will be in recital during exposition hours: Thursday Dec 2 thru Sunday Dec 5, 4.00pm - 8.00pm The SLAVE PIANOS installation includes the published musical scores in the form of sheet music and features the full repertoire of piano transcriptions.

In addition to the piano recitals the SLAVE COLLECTIVE presents aba’+c, a series of three evening performances that will take place during the SLAVE PIANOS exposition.

a

Thursday December 2 at 8.00pm (SLAVE CHAMBER: menage a quatre) the FLUX Quartet will present the world premiere of visual artists sound works from the SLAVE ARCHIVE recomposed for string quartet. The performance will feature works by Schwitters, Marclay, Macuinas and Duchamp. FLUX are: Tom Chiu-violin, Cornelius Dufallo-violin, Kenji Bunch-viola and Darrett Adkins-cello. FLUX have an established presence at the Lincoln Center, the Museum of Modern Art as well as cutting edge venues like the Knitting Factory and are world renowned for their performances of the modern repertoire. FLUX has also worked with a wide range of contemporary musicians and artists.

b

Saturday December 4 at 8.00pm (Anti-Jazz: the vibrational liquid of improvisation) a jazz ensemble working under the umbrella ANTI-JAZZ will perform Barney McAll’s arrangements from the SLAVE ARCHIVE including works by Anderson, Ono, Prina and Cole. Barney McAll has performed with Gary Bartz, Bill Harper and Vincent Herring. ANTI-JAZZ includes Ben Monder, guitar and Ben Street, bass.

a’+c

Sunday December 5 at 8.00pm (Caged/Uncaged: unleash the beats) Australian and NY performances including works by Cage, Nauman, McCarthy, Boltansky and Ousler for violin (Tom Chui of Flux), prepared piano, flugelhorn, accordion, harmonica, percussion and tape. From 9.00pm, Sunday, DJ OLIVE will be cutting breaks from the SLAVE ARCHIVE. Renowned as an experimentalist, DJ OLIVE performs internationally as a cutting edge audio janitor.

The SLAVE PIANOS ARCHIVE includes works by: Magdelena Abakanowicz, Vito Acconci, Laurie Anderson, Hany Armanious, John Baldessari, John Barleycorn, Joseph Beuys, John Borofsky, Louise Bourgeois, Glen Branca, George Brecht, L. Budd, Chris Burden, David Byrne, Jon Campbell, Ciurlionis, Tony Clark, Domenico de Clario, Martin Creed, Julian Dashper, Jean Dubuffet, Marcel Duchamp, Terence Fox, Katharina Fritsch, Marco Fusinato, Dan Graham, Jeny Holzer, Joe Jones, Ilya Kabakov, Mike Kelley, Martin Kersels, Martin Kippenberger, Alison Knowles, Barbara Kruger, Sergei Kuryokhin, Louise Lawler, Thomas Lawson, Richard Long, Marinetti, Paul McCarthy, Bruce McLean, Daniel Malone, Christian Marclay, Jonas Mekas, Milkstar, Thurston Moore, Bruce Nauman, Herman Nitsch, Yoko Ono, Dennis Oppenheim, Gabriel Orozco, Tony Ousler, Nam June Paik, Martin Popperwell, Stephen Prina, Dieter Roth, Kurt Merz Schwitters, Ross Sinclair, Solver, Ricky Swallow, Takis, D M Thomas, Jean Tinguely, Peter Tyndall, Ronnie van Hout, Bill Viola, Lawrence Weiner, Emmett Williams and David Wojnarowicz.

The New York exposition/recital of SLAVE PIANOS is part of a world tour, which began at the Museum Fridericianum (Kassel, Germany) and the Auckland Art Gallery (New Zealand) where it featured as part of the exhibition Toi Toi Toi: three generations of artists from New Zealand curated by Rene Block. SLAVE PIANOS has also performed at Stills Gallery (Edinburgh, Scotland), Lovers ( Melbourne, Australia ), Darren Knight Gallery (Sydney, Australia ). SLAVE PIANOS will also be in performance in Los Angeles at China Art Objects Galleries in February 2000.

SLAVE PIANOS tour is supported in Australia by the International Export and Touring Program of Arts Victoria and the Australia Council.

Slave Pianos, ¡¡Emancipate the Dissonance!!, Press Release

lombard fried fine arts
November 10, 1999
Press Info: LDP/M
Michelle Berger/Liz Dunn 212–691–1970

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

LOMBARD-FREID FINE ARTS PRESENTS THE
NEW YORK PREMIERE OF
SLAVE PIANOS ¡¡EMANCIPATE THE DISSONANCE!!
THREE RECITALS OF VISUAL ARTISTS’ MUSIC AND SOUND ART

Acclaimed Australian artists Mike Stevenson and Danius Kesminas bring their collaborative music/media concert project, Slave Pianos, to SoHo, December 2–5, 1999. All performances of Slave Pianos, will feature the slave piano — a computer-controlled mechanical piano player performing arrangements of visual artists’ works in sound — and will be held at Lombard-Freid Projects on the second floor at 470 Broome Street in New York City. The world renowned FLUX Quartet will perform live at the opening of this exciting experimental music series/installation on Thursday, December 2, 1999 at 8pm. The entire performance schedule is as follows:

Thursday-Sunday, December 2–5, 4–8pm

Slave Pianos Installation the entire gallery space will be transformed into an “archive” detailing the creative process and exhibiting parts of the Slave Pianos Project.

Thursday December 2 8pm

Opening Evening Slave Collective Concert Performance featuring a live performance by the FLUX QUARTET of visual artists’ music and sound art arranged for strings.

Saturday December 4 8pm

Slave Collective performance of visual artists’ music and sound art in collaboration with a live jazz ensemble.

Sunday December 5 8pm

Slave Collective performance of visual artists’ music and sound art arranged for the violin, piano, flugelhorn, accordion, harmonica, percussion, and tape.

Sunday December 5 9pm

DJ OLIVE will be cutting breaks from a selection of visual artists’ music and sound art.

Tickets for all performances will be sold at the door of the gallery at an admission fee of $5.

No reservation is required.

531 west 26th street new york, new york 10001 phone 212 967 8040 fax 212 967 0669 lomfrd@echonyc.com


Blending the visual and audio, Slave Pianos seeks to broaden the knowledge, appreciation, and understanding of works in sound created by artists more often associated with the visual realm. Australian ethnomusicologists and visual artists Mike Stevenson and Danius Kesminas’ show, Slave Pianos, draws from their Slave Archive, an expansive audio library of sound works created by various visual artists. Using original recordings from the Slave Archive , Stevenson and Kesminas have worked with composers to recompose, arrange, and transcribe the material to bring you Slave Pianos, an exposition comprised of a series of installations and performances featuring the Slave Piano — a computer-controlled mechanical piano player.

The Slave Piano creates a trace back to the artists’ original recording and provides a portrait of the original performance. Slave Pianos is a project that grew out of Stevenson and Kesminas’ common interest in the history and practices of visual artists working with sound.

At the center of the Slave Pianos philosophy is the apotheosis of the grand piano within modern and contemporary art/music practices. With the collaborative efforts of Australian composers Neil Kelly and Rohan Drape, and pianist Barney McAll, Stevenson and Kesminas have created a sound that their country has embraced. Australia’s fascination with Slave Pianos resinates an antipodean desire to lay claim to the grand piano, a view reflected in such films as Jane Campion’s The Piano, the David Helfgott story as portrayed in Shine, and Passion, a film detailing the life of Australia’s most innovative 20th century composer, Percy Grainger.

Slave Pianos repertoire includes works by Vito Acconci, Laurie Anderson, John Baldessari, Joseph Beuys, Louise Bourgeois, George Brecht, L. Budd, Chris Burden, David Byrne, Tony Clark, Dornenico de Clario, Martin Creed, Jean Dubuffet, Marcel Duchamp, Katharina Fritsch, Marco Fusinato, Mike Kelley, Martin Kersels, Martin Kippenberger, Louise Lawler, Thomas Lawson, Paul McCarthy, Bruce McLean, Daniel Malone, Christian Marclay, Bruce Nauman, Yoko Ono, Dennis Oppenheim, Gabriel Orozco, Tony Oursler, Nam June Paik, Martin Popperwell, Stephen Prina, Deiter Roth, Kurt Merz Schwitters, Ross Sinclair, Ricky Swallpw, DM Thomas, Jean Tinguely, Peter Tyndall, Ronnie van Hout, Bill Viola, and David Wojnarowicz.

Mike Stevenson has been exhibiting in Australia for 10 years and in the US since 1997. Through a series of photo-realist drawings and objects he seamlessly introduces conspiracy theory as a framework to help explain the thirty year course of contemporary art production. More recently, this has given way to pure empirical research. Stevenson’s latter-day studies could be described in terms of an artworld ecology where endangered practices are nurtured while introduced forms are analyzed to determine their impact on the local environment. Stevenson was featured in the Drawing Center’s “Selections Fall 98” and had his first New York Solo show entitled “the Gift of Critical Insight” at Lombard-Freid Fine Arts in 1998. This year he has exhibited in Germany at the Museum Fridericianum Kassel, and in the exhibition “What Your Children Should Know About Conceptualism” at the Neuer Aachener Kunstverein and the Brandenburgischer Kunstverein Potsdam.

The New York showing of Slave Pianos is part of a world tour, which began at the Museum Fridericianum (Kassel, Germany) and the Auckland Art Gallery (New Zealand) where it featured Toi Toi Toi: three generations of artists from New Zealand, curated by Rene Block. Slave Pianos also performed at Stills Gallery (Edinburgh, Scotland), Lovers (Melbourne, Australia), and Darren Knight Gallery (Sydney, Australia). Following this New York showing, Slave Pianos will be performing in Los Angeles at China Art Objects Galleries in February, 2000. Lombard-Freid Fine Arts supports young emerging American artists and important, cutting-edge international artists whose works challenge aesthetic and conceptual boundaries. Slave Pianos is supported in Australia by the International Export and Touring Program of Arts Victoria and the Australia Council.

For more information regarding the concert series, the artists, and ticket/gallery information, call Lea Freid at Lombard-Freid Fine Arts (212) 967–8040. For press information, call Liz or Michelle at LDP/M (212) 691–1970.

Slave Pianos, The Compromised Economy of Desire and Fear, Press Release

The Compromised Economy of Desire and Fear

For Immediate Release

SLAVE PIANOS, in association with the CHINA ART OBJECTS, present “The Compromised Economy of Desire and Fear”, a recital and installation of artists’ music and sound works.

Featuring:

  1. Post-pop sensation Adawo, fronted by painter Jon Campbell, performing material by Martin Creed’s Owada

  2. The experimental noise trio Flubb performing works by LA artists Mike Kelley, Tony Oursler, Jim Shaw & Paul McCarthy (world premiere)

  3. DJ KUYA, 1999 Australian ITF DJ champion and three time winner of the DMC DJ championships, cutting breaks from the SLAVE ARCHIVE acetate (Australian premiere)

  4. A performance of Composition 11 - audio roulette for three turntables by SLAVE PIANOS New York collaborator DJ Olive the audio janitor by the controversial artists’ collective, DAMP (Australian premiere)

  5. Recompositions for trombone choir, violin, percussion and computer generated tape of works by Jean Tinguely, Bruce Nauman, John Baldessari, and Christian Boltanski, arrangements by Rohan Drape, Neil Kelly, Madeleine Flynn and Tim Humphrey (Australian premiere)

  6. Stage design by Jon Campbell and Callum Morton

at:

The Public Office Carpark 
2nd Floor 100 Adderley St West Melbourne
Saturday February 26th 2000
Performances start at 8.15pm, Bar Opens 7.30 pm 
Free Admission. 

SLAVE PIANOS is an organisation devoted to the collection, analysis, performance, and recomposition of sound work by visual artists. In the last year SLAVE PIANOS have presented exhibitions and performances in Melbourne, Sydney, Auckland, Glasgow, Kassel and New York; and have collaborated with DJ Olive, the Flux String Quartet, the Elektra String Quartet, Barney McAll and the Anti-JAZZ Bentet, , Robbie Rhodes (Mechanical Music Association), the Astra Chamber Music Society, Latrobe University & QRS research division.

SLAVE PIANOS are:

Founding Members: Michael Stevenson, Danius Kesminas, Neil Kelly, Rohan Drape.

Associates: Anthony Pateras, Barney McAll, Jon Campbell.

Slave Pianos are performing in St Petersburg’s Sergey Kuyokhin International Festival in April 2000, and will be installed at the Australian National Gallery, Canberra from July.

The SLAVE PIANOS ARCHIVE includes works by: Magdelena Abakanowicz, Vito Acconci, Laurie Anderson, Hany Armanious, John Baldessari, John Barleycorn, Joseph Beuys, John Borofsky, Louise Bourgeois, Glen Branca, George Brecht, L. Budd, Chris Burden, David Byrne, Jon Campbell, Ciurlionis, Tony Clark, Domenico de Clario, Martin Creed, Julian Dashper, Jean Dubuffet, Marcel Duchamp, Terence Fox, Katharina Fritsch, Marco Fusinato, Dan Graham, Jeny Holzer, Joe Jones, Ilya Kabakov, Mike Kelley, Martin Kersels, Martin Kippenberger, Alison Knowles, Barbara Kruger, Sergei Kuryokhin, Louise Lawler, Thomas Lawson, Richard Long, Marinetti, Paul McCarthy, Bruce McLean, Daniel Malone, Christian Marclay, Jonas Mekas, Milkstar, Thurston Moore, Bruce Nauman, Herman Nitsch, Yoko Ono, Dennis Oppenheim, Gabriel Orozco, Tony Ousler, Nam June Paik, Martin Popperwell, Stephen Prina, Dieter Roth, Kurt Merz Schwitters, Ross Sinclair, Solver, Ricky Swallow, Takis, D M Thomas, Jean Tinguely, Peter Tyndall, Ronnie van Hout, Bill Viola, Lawrence Weiner, Emmett Williams and David Wojnarowicz.

This Saturday’s event coincides with the opening of the SLAVE PIANOS exposition at CHINA ART OBJECTS 833 Chung King Rd Los Angeles California 90012, co-ordinated by Michael Stevenson.

Slave Pianos, Non-Objective Labour, Press Release

Slave Pianos
127 Charles St Abbotsford, Vic, 3067
Phone: –613–9419 0206
Fax: –613–96392641

SLAVE PIANOS PERFORM AT SERGEY KURYOKHIN INTERNATIONAL FESTIVAL, ST PETERSBURG AND MOSCOW

April 14th–20th, 2000

SLAVE PIANOS, in association with the SERGEY KURYOKHIN INTERNATIONAL FESTIVAL, present a recital and installation of artists’ music and sound works.

Featuring:

  1. THE KRASNYI STRING QUARTET at THE BALTYISKI DOM THEATRE and
  2. THE SLAVE PIANO (a computer controlled mechanical piano playing device)

performing arrangements and recompositions of works by leading twentieth century visual artists.

SLAVE PIANOS is an organisation devoted to the collection, analysis, performance, and recomposition of sound work by visual artists. In the last year SLAVE PIANOS have presented exhibitions and performances in Melbourne, Sydney, Auckland, Glasgow, Kassel, Los Angeles and New York; and have collaborated with DJ Olive, the Flux String Quartet, the Elektra String Quartet, Barney McAll and the Anti-JAZZ Bentet, Adawo, Flubb, Damp, Robbie Rhodes (Mechanical Music Association), the Astra Chamber Music Society, Latrobe University and QRS research division. The show will be installed at the Australian National Gallery, Canberra from July 2000.

SLAVE PIANOS are Australians: Michael Stevenson, Danius Kesminas, Neil Kelly, Rohan Drape. SLAVE PIANOS seeks to broaden the knowledge, appreciation and understanding of sound works created by people who are predominantly known in the field of the visual arts. To this end, they have created an ongoing archive documenting these works in sound. Original recordings from the archive have been recomposed, arranged and transcribed for piano and string quartet, jazz bands, rock bands, computer generated tape, brass and other ensembles.

The SLAVE PIANOS ARCHIVE includes works by: Magdelena Abakanowicz, Vito Acconci, Laurie Anderson, Hany Armanious, John Baldessari, John Barleycorn, Joseph Beuys, John Borofsky, Louise Bourgeois, Glen Branca, George Brecht, L. Budd, Chris Burden, David Byrne, Jon Campbell, Ciurlionis, Tony Clark, Domenico de Clario, Martin Creed, Julian Dashper, Jean Dubuffet, Marcel Duchamp, Terence Fox, Katharina Fritsch, Marco Fusinato, Dan Graham, Jeny Holzer, Joe Jones, Ilya Kabakov, Mike Kelley, Martin Kersels, Martin Kippenberger, Alison Knowles, Barbara Kruger, Sergei Kuryokhin, Louise Lawler, Thomas Lawson, Richard Long, Marinetti, Paul McCarthy, Bruce McLean, Daniel Malone, Christian Marclay, Jonas Mekas, Milkstar, Thurston Moore, Bruce Nauman, Herman Nitsch, Yoko Ono, Dennis Oppenheim, Gabriel Orozco, Tony Ousler, Nam June Paik, Martin Popperwell, Stephen Prina, Dieter Roth, Kurt Merz Schwitters, Ross Sinclair, Solver, Ricky Swallow, Takis, D M Thomas, Jean Tinguely, Peter Tyndall, Ronnie van Hout, Bill Viola, Lawrence Weiner, Emmett Williams and David Wojnarowicz.

A long tale with many notes

015-026

The Voyage or Three Years at Sea (Part 2), September-October 2011

The Voyage, or Three Years at Sea Part II: Bas Jan Ader, Matthew Benedict, Karl Haendel, Nina Katchadourian, Slave Pianos

  • Emily Carr University of Art + Design
  • September 7–October 23, 2011
  • Opening: Tuesday, September 6 at 7:30pm

    Charles H. Scott Gallery Emily Carr University 1399 Johnston Street Vancouver, BC T 604.844.3809

The Charles H. Scott Gallery is pleased to present The Voyage, or Three Years at Sea Part II featuring the work of Bas Jan Ader, Matthew Benedict, Karl Haendel, Nina Katchadourian, and Slave Pianos. The second in a multi-part series about the sea, the exhibition looks at ill-fated voyages from Shackleton’s Antarctic expedition to Bas Jan Ader’s attempt to sail across the Atlantic. Accompanying the works of contemporary art are objects and archival materials on loan from the Maritime Museum and private collections.

Dutch artist Bas Jan Ader disappeared in 1975, while attempting a solo transatlantic crossing. His voyage was part of a project entitled In Search of the Miraculous, a component of which is in the exhibition. Ader would have known of Donald Crowhurst, an English yachtsman who in 1968 also went missing on a solo voyage (a copy of a book about Crowhurst was found in Ader’s possessions). The story of both men is conflated in a work by the Australian collective Slave Pianos (Danius Kesminus, Michael Stevenson, Neil Kelly, Rohan Drape). The Strange Voyage of Bas Jan Ader is a radio play, musical score and collection of documents that are drawn from an interview with Ader’s widow and the ramblings of Crowhurst.

Two artists in the exhibition take Ernest Shackleton’s doomed expedition to the Antarctic as their subject. Los Angeles-based Karl Haendel has produced an installation of hyper-realistic drawings taken from photographs of the expedition while New York artist Nina Katchadourian’s Endurance is a video projection in which original film footage of Shackleton’s ship breaking up in the ice is projected on her tooth. A historic event of great notoriety is also the subject of New York-based Matthew Benedict Titanic Breakfast Sampler.

In dialogue with the works of contemporary art will be a selection of historical materials documenting ill-fated voyages from coastal British Columbia. Of particular note is a poignant artefact from the 1875 wreck of the Pacific on loan from the Vancouver Maritime Museum. The Maritime Museum will be collaborating with the Charles H. Scott Gallery on a series of public events in conjunction with the exhibition.

Karl Haendel will be in attendance at the opening and will be giving a talk on his work in the gallery at 3:30pm on Wednesday September 7th.

The exhibition is curated by Cate Rimmer.

For more information please contact the gallery at 604 844 3809. Gallery hours are 12–5 weekdays and 10–5 weekends. Admission is free.

artandeducation.net/announcement

Slave Pianos, Two Lives in Flux: And Vice Versa, Press Release

020-001

Slave Pianos, Dissident Consonances, Press Release

022-007

Slave Pianos, Dissident Consonances, Press Release

DISSIDENT CONSONANCES synopsis derived from the article 2 x mini GIANTS, Nam June Paik, ARTFORUM, March 1991

The East European revolution produced a playwright-president in Czechoslovakia, but few people know that it also produced a Fluxus-president: Vytautas Landsbergis, the 1990 president of Lithuania. This bespectacled and stoop-shouldered music professor successfully defied the blockade of Soviet power and the “benevolent” advice of the Western press to go slow lest he destroy the superpower summit.

This David-and-Goliath situation is reminiscent of the audacious manner of Landsbergis’ friend, George Maciunas, founder of the “small” Fluxus Movement and the “enormous” SoHo glitz.

Landsbergis and Maciunas were both the sons of well-to-do architects, and were best friends at a grade school in Kaunas, Lithuania, in the last peaceful days of pre-war Europe. In 1965, as a native Marxist, Maciunas contacted the old friend he had left in Lithuania, who was alas a burning anti-Marxist. In response, Landsbergis sent Maciunas some subversive performance ideas.

Later, feeling betrayed by his comrades, George Maciunas, dictator and chairman of Fluxus, declared the movement dead and plunged himself into the SoHo housing project. In 1978, Maciunas died aged 47 in poverty. Soon a quiet renaissance of Fluxus began and behind the iron curtain the slow rebirth of Lithuania continued, led by the stubborn ex-Fluxus man Vytautas Landsbergis.

Could their relationship, correspondence and Fluxus activity have contributed to the thaw of the cold war and the demise of the Soviet Union? After all, Landsbergis ascended to become Lithuania’s first post-Soviet Head of State and in 2004 this Fluxus alumnus was elected to the European Parliament in Brussels.

Slave Pianos, Never Forever: Fluxus Was a Sajudis Trick!, Press Release

023-004023-004023-004

The Lepidopters: Part II

YES NO KLUB & KONGSI JAHAT SYNDICATE

Mempersembahkan sebuah proyek seni lintas-disiplin yang menampilkan kolaborasi musik, seni rupa, film animasi dan komik dalam sebuah pertunjukan opera

THE LEPIDOPTERS: A SCIENCE-FICTION SPACE OPERA

Acara ini diselenggarakan selama 2 hari:
JUMAT, 21 MARET 2014
20.00 - 21.30

SABTU, 22 MARET 2014
20.00 - 21.30

Tempat:
Gedung Societet Taman Budaya Yogyakarta
Jalan Sriwedari, Yogyakarta

Tiket: IDR 20.000


The Lepidopters terdiri atas:

  • Slave Pianos (Melbourne)
  • Punkasila (Yogyakarta)
  • Michael Kieran Harvey (Hobart)
  • Rachel Saraswati (Yogyakarta)
  • Sekar Jindra (Yogyakarta)
  • Alexander Garsden (Melbourne)
  • Aviva Endean (Melbourne)

Pada November 2012 Slave Pianos (kelompok seniman kontemporer asal Melbourne, Australia) meminta penulis fiksi ilmiah dan kritikus seni Mark von Schlegell (Amerika) untuk menulis The Lepidopters, tiga jilid komik fiksi ilmiah berlatar Indonesia. Komik ini digambar dan diwarnai oleh seniman Yogyakarta “Iwank” Erwan Hersi Susanto. Komik ini secara umum bercerita tentang serbuan mahluk asing berbentuk ngengat ke kepulauan Indonesia, yang berencana untuk menguasai Bumi melalui pembuahan antar-spesies.

Sesungguhnya teks The Lepidopters merupakan suatu sandi rumit yang menghubungkan karya seniman Amerika Robert Smithson dengan karya Slave Pianos dan kolektif multi-disiplin Punkasila di Yogyakarta, dan mengaitkannya dengan sistem mistik Jawa kuno.

The Lepidopters: A Science-Fiction Space-Opera (The Lepidopters: Sebuah Opera Fiksi Sains) terdiri atas pianis avantgarde, band rock, gamelan, rangkaian elektronika analog dan proyeksi film animasi. Konser perdana dipentaskan di sebuah festival musik eksperimental Mona Foma di Hobart, Tasmania pada bulan Januari 2014.

Proyek ini juga melibatkan beberapa musisi lainnya yaitu Michael Kieran Harvey (seorang pianis avantgarde), Rachel Saraswati (penyanyi, aktor), Alexander Garsden (gitaris) dan Aviva Endean (saksofon). Pada pementasan The Lepidopters di Jogja ini, mereka berkolaborasi dengan kelompok gamelan Sekar Jindra. Sebuah film animasi yang diadaptasi dari komik digarap oleh Terra Bajragosha.

The Lepidopters menghubungkan karya Robert Smithson, yang terlibat erat pada gerakan re-imajinasi radikal atas karya-karya fiksi ilmiah eksperimental pada awal ’70-an, yang karyanya berkembang dalam lanskap bunyi (sonic) yang diperluas melalui elektronika analog, dan dalam lanskap interior fiktif visi utopis dan distopian. Semua itu dirujuk dalam teks susunan von Schlegell. Semua aspek lain dari karya ini tersirat dalam komik, dalam pementasan dan desain kostum, desain alat-alat musik baru, film animasi yang diproyeksikan selama pertunjukan, dan buku program atau materi cetak lain yang menyertainya.

Pertunjukan ini juga akan disiarkan langsung secara online oleh Pamityang2an Radio di pamityang2an.com

Pementasan selanjutnya akan digelar di Melbourne, Australia pada tanggal 13 dan 14 April 2014.


Yes No Klub mengorganisir sebuah acara musik eksperimental dan pameran lintas-disiplin seni rupa kontemporer dan musik di Yogyakarta, dengan tujuan untuk memberikan wadah dan pengembangan seni dan budaya yang progresif di Indonesia.

Kongsi Jahat Syndicate merupakan sebuah kolektif yang memproduksi pertunjukan musik independen di Yogyakarta.


Kontak: Adi Adriandi - 0818 042 701 13


Pertunjukan ini terselenggara atas kerjasama antara Australia Council For The Arts, Yes No Klub dan Kongsi Jahat Syndicate

yesnoklub.yesnowave.com

ASTRA Press Release

Astra, Arts House and Slave Pianos

LEPIDOPTERS: A Space Opera

SATURDAY APRIL 12 AT 3.00PM & 7.30PM
SUNDAY APRIL 13 AT 5.00PM

ARTS HOUSE
NORTH MELBOURNE TOWN HALL
521 Queensberry Street
North Melbourne

Slave Pianos Rohan Drape, Neil Kelly, Antanas Kesminas, Danius Kesminas, Dave Nelson, Michael Stevenson
The Astra Choir conducted by John McCaughey
Punkasila Uji ‘Hahan’ Handoko Eko Saputro, Rudy ‘Atjeh’ Dharmawan, Antariksa, Erwan ‘Iwank’ Hersisusanto, Prihatmoko ‘Moki’ Catur
Rachel Saraswati voice/dance
Michael Kieran Harvey piano
Aviva Endean clarinet Laila Engle flute Daniel Richardson percussion
Richard Piper narrator
Terra Bajraghosa video artist

A kulturnautic expedition defying the sovereign borders of visual arts and music, The Lepidopters responds to a commissioned text by sci-fi writer Mark von Schlegell, in which alien moths invade the Indonesian archipelago with the aim of colonising Earth through inter-species reproduction. Including projected illustrations and film by Yogyakarta artists Erwan ‘Iwank’ Hersisusanto and Terra Bajraghosa, this multi-art-form concert draws on the work of Robert Smithson to investigate sonic landscapes and dystopian visions, Indonesian telepathy, ancient Javanese mysticism, and art practices both traditional and modern.

Central to the staging of The Lepidopters are the Sedulur Gamelan (“Gamelan Sisters”) – a self-governing electro-mechanical ‘slave gamelan’ housed in two large interlocking wooden structures.

A trailblazing choir, a concert pianist, a pop-star mezzo-soprano, a punk band with just- intonation ‘gyrostatic’ guitars, noise machines, video installation, an automated gamelan and analogue electronics, The Lepidopters is a renegade cross-cultural and inter-planetary event.

Tickets: Full $25/Conc $20/Student $15 (tickets selling fast!)

BOOKINGS: artshouse.com.au or (03) 9322 3713

ASTRA CHAMBER MUSIC SOCIETY
PO Box 365, North Melbourne, Victoria 3051, Australia. ABN 41 255 197 577
Tel: (03) 9326 5424 email: info@astramusic.org.au astramusic.org.au

Slave Pianos, An Evening With Slave Pianos, Invitation

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Slave Pianos, An Evening With Slave Pianos, Invitation

darren knight + lovers present an evening with slave pianos
neil kelly + rohan drape
danius kesminas + michael stevenson
15 may - 23 may
drinks + matinee performance from 4pm sat 15 may
bands from 7.3Opm
lovers
1/108 moor street fitzroy
4 — 7pm fri to sun
tel. 03 — 9417 0057

with barney mcall, adawo + anti-jazz — special guests jon campbell, craig fermanis, dave o’brien, tom zdanius — special thanks to latrobe music department

Slave Pianos, Music of the City, Invitation

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Slave Pianos, Music of the City, Invitation

003-013

Slave Pianos, The Compromised Economy of Desire and Fear, Invitation

009-008

Slave Pianos, China Art Objects Galleries: Slave Pianos, Invitation

010-008

Slave Pianos, Songs of Life, Invitation

SLAVE PIANOS INTERNATIONALE BIENNALE 2000

SONGS OF LIFE

exposition/recitals of artists’ music and sound works

The Slave Pianos Internationale Biennale is an initiative of RMIT Gallery and The National Gallery of Australia, in partnership with The Australian Centre for Contemporary Art and The Court House Hotel, North Melbourne.

15 JULY - 22 OCTOBER 2000

“…at best, a dubious tribute to a lot of important work by a lot of other artists.” Charles LeBelle (Frieze)

“…what you hear is what you see.” Peter Frank (L.A. Weekly)


Five International Pavillions:
Korean, Lithuanian, French, Swiss, Latvian
A LONG TALE WITH MANY NOTES
performed by DeFlocked String Quartet
Hope Csutoros violin Daniel Stefanski violin
Jenny Thomas viola Helen Mountfort cello
Saturday 15 July, 8pm free entry / pay bar +GST
RMIT Gallery, Storey Hall 344 Swanston Street Melbourne
Telephone +61 3 9925 1717 Facsimile +61 3 9925 1738
tram no 1 2 3 5 6 8 15 21 22 16 21 64 67 72
for the occasion of the closing of “Fluxus in Germany 1962–1994” followed by

Artists Party
as a tribute to Martin Creed and Owada
The Histrionics present ADAWO
Saturday 15 July, 9.30pm free entry / meals from $3.50 no GST
Court House Hotel 86 Errol Street North Melbourne 3051
Telephone +61 3 9329 5394 tram no. 57 50

Please note: The exhibition will not be available for viewing during the party.

APERTO
Cutting breaks from the Slave Pianos archive:
Graeme Leak electronics / percussion
DJ Shake’n’Bake turntables
Monday 17 July, 6.30pm entry fee $5/$3 conc. +GST
ACCA
Dallas Brooks Drive South Yarra Victoria 3141
Telephone +61 3 9654 6422 Facsimile +61 3 9650 3438
tram no 1 2 3 5 8 15 16 64 67 72

Australian Pavilion
NON-OBJECTIVE BRASS
ANTI-MUSIC performed by The Burley-Griffin Brass Band
Wednesday 26 July, 12 noon free entry
The Slave Piano performing daily until 22 October
NGA
Parkes Place Canberra 2600
Telephone +61 2 6240 6502 Facsimile +61 2 6271 2529
v line Canberra Link service, FireFly Service


SONGS OF LIFE Magdelena ABAKANOWICZ Vito ACCONCI Laurie ANDERSON John BALDESSARI John BARLEYCORN BECK Joseph BEUYS/Nam June PAIK Jonathan BOROFSKY Louise BOURGEOIS Glen BRANCA George BRECHT Lillian BUDD Christopher BURDEN David BYRNE Jonathan CAMPBELL Cornelius CARDEW Gunter CHRISTMANN M.C. CIURLIONIS Tony CLARK Philip CORNER Martin CREED DAMP Julian DASHPER Domenico De CLARIO Marcel DUCHAMP Jean DUBUFFET Phillip EDWARDS Terence FOX Katherina FRITSCH Marco FUSINATO Daniel GRAHAM Rolf HARRIS Jennifer HOLZER Keith HUMBLE Joe JONES Ilya KABAKOV Allan KAPROW Michael KELLEY Martin KERSELS Martin KIPPENBERGER Alison KNOWLES Barbara KRUGER Thomas LAWSON John LENNON/Paul McCarthy Richard LONG Bruce McLEAN ***fluxemblage*** George MACIUNAS Daniel MALONE/Martin POPPERWELL MARINETTI Jonas MEKAS MILKSTAR Thurston MOORE Herman NITSCH David PATTON Stephen PRINA Dieter ROTH Erik SATIE Kurt Merz SCHWITTERS Pat SCULL Alexander SELENITSCH Ross SINGLAIR SOLVER Richard SWALLOW TAKIS D.M.THOMAS/Hany ARMANIOUS Imants TILLERS Peter TYNDALL Ronnie Van HOUT Laurence WEINER Emmet WILLIAMS David WOJNAROWICZ La Monte YOUNG ZAJ ARTISTS

Slave Pianos, Aperto, Invitation

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The Voyage or Three Years at Sea (Part 2), September-October 2011

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The Voyage or Three Years at Sea (Part 2), September-October 2011

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Slave Pianos, Foreign Knowledge, Invitation

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Slave Pianos, Foreign Knowledge, Invitation

019-007

Slave Pianos, Dissident Consonances, Invitation

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Slave Pianos, Dissident Consonances, Invitation

SLAVE PIANOS & the ASTRA CHOIR present:
DISSIDENT CONSONANCES or:
THE IRON CURTAIN, THE FLUX-LABYRINTH* & LITHUANIAN HOUSE or:
Chairman George Maciunas & President Vytautas Landsbergis
5pm Saturday 26 / 5pm Sunday 27 May 2007
Lithuanian House
44 Errol Street, North Melbourne

DISSIDENT CONSONANCES (2007) first performance. Based on the correspondence of Fluxus founder George Maciunas and Lithuania’s first post-Soviet Head of State, Vytautas Landsbergis. A multi-spaced performance through the foyers and halls of Lithuanian House:

  1. portal intervention, choir & mechanized piano recital
  2. play with speech-chorus & projections
  3. chamber concert with organ, voices, dances & games
  4. film with choir, multiple keyboards, cello & narration
  5. vodka pipeline organ, vodka jelly & potato pancakes

music, art, non-art, theatre, diaries, letters, poetry, testimonies, political writings, manifestos, film, dance, food, drink and other objects by SLAVE PIANOS, George Maciunas, Vytautas Landsbergis, Jonas Mekas, Leokadija Maciunas, Claudio Monteverdi, Henry Purcell, Jean DeMaque, M.K.Ciurlionis, Anonymous (14th Century), Ottavio Rinuccini, Keith Humble, George Brecht, Nam June Paik, Joseph Beuys, Larry Miller & Joe Jones

* “No morons, drunks, women (or men) wearing high heels, people with wooden legs – or those who don’t like elephants,” George Maciunas’ caution at the entrance to the FLUX-LABYRINTH, Berlin 1976


SLAVE PIANOS:
Danius Kesminas, Neil Kelly, Rohan Drape & Michael Stevenson
ASTRA CHOIR conducted by John McCaughey
actor: Richard Piper
narration: Alena Karazijiene OAM (Vytautas Landsbergis’ sister)
organ positive, organ portative, regal, harpsichord, celeste & pianos: Kim Bastin, Joan Pollock, Peter Dumsday & Elizabeth Anderson
cello: Caerwen Martin
dancing & games: Nerija Zemkalnis (Vytautas Landsbergis’ great-niece) & the MESSY ASPECT Folk Collage Theatre
vodka pipeline organ: Dave Nelson & Antanas Kesminas
vodka jelly & pancake chef: Dana Binkis & the Australian-Lithuanian Women’s Welfare Association
sound: Michael Hewes
production assistant: Angela Pamic manager: Bobbie Hodge

single ticket prices: FULL: $27 CONC: $15 (includes low income earners, seniors & Lithuanian Club members), STUDENT: $10. Arts workers charged double!** bookings: Tel: 03 9326 5424 or Email: astra@connexus.net.au

DISSIDENT CONSONANCES is a sequel to SLAVE PIANOS’ oratorio-theatre work TWO LIVES IN FLUX – AND VICE VERSA performed in Vilnius, Lithuania in 2004

** “I always charge double to artists, that’s what artists deserve. They are all phonies, you know!” Jonas Mekas recounting George Maciunas’ management of the Fluxus cooperative studio buildings in SoHo, New York in the late 1960’s

SLAVE PIANOS is represented by DARREN KNIGHT GALLERY, Sydney

The Gift - Redaction and Decontamination (Invitation)

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Slave Pianos, Sedulur Gamelan/Gamelan Sisters, Invitation

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Invitation: [pdf]

A Sedimentation of the Mind, National Gallery of Victoria

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A Sedimentation of the Mind, National Gallery of Victoria

A SEDIMENTATION OF THE MIND

Friday nights at Melbourne Now present:

Slave Pianos

A Sedimentation of the Mind

featuring:

8pm Friday 28th February
Exhibition space, Level 3
The Ian Potter Centre
NGV Australia
Federation Square
Free

Slave Pianos’ Gamelan Sisters plays music inspired by the work of 1960s earthworks artist Robert Smithson. While four musicians and an automated-gamelan play music inspired by Smithson’s drawings, Dr Chris McAuliffe will narrate the story of these ‘displacements’ from the American landscape to Federation Square.

Slave Pianos, A Schema and Historo-Materialist Pro-gnostic, Interview

Danius Kesminas - Interview

Published Tuesday, June 14, 2005

Introduction

G‘day, welcome to the Slave Piano’s laboratory - this is the headquarters for research into visual artists’ soundworks. It’s a collaborative project involving another artist Michael Stevenson and two composers - Rohan Drape and Neil Kelly. And you can see the work is primarily a form of archival research dedicated to the preservation of visual artists sound works throughout the century.

Artists from Duchamp through to Tinguely and Joseph Beuys and even in Australia artists like Domenico de Clario and John Nixon, have made music works as a side project. We’ve bracketed out those sound works and re arranged them, transcribed them and recomposed them for piano. This process involved Neil’s and Rohan’s expertise to extract what was musical from the original performance, which in some cases was purely noisework, possibly improvisation or some kind of performance, even video soundtrack work..

This music was notated for piano and performed by the Slave Piano which is a form of mechanical reproduction.

Process

Just to explain the process and the way the collective functions: here is a difficult to find record released by CBD Gallery (an artists run space in Sydney), it’s a whole program of visual artists’ recordings. One piece here by Hany Armanious and David.M.Thomas sounds a little like this - you can hear the piece in the background (plays the recording). Here is the piece now transcribed for piano by Neil and Rohan.

In actual fact it is being performed by the jazz pianist Barney McAll. So you can hear there is a correlation between the original guitar noise work and the final piano arrangement. It is a way of extracting the essence out of the original piece but transferring it to piano. You could say it is a literal translation of one piece to the other. And here is the final art work, where the final product is presented as sheet music. Michael and I have done the art work, here’s Hany and here’s David - and clearly if you are competent enough or that way inclined you can actually play this piece yourself at home. It’s a way of making the original work accessible.

The Archive

All of our archive material has taken this form - here is a piece by George Brecht, from 1959, Comb Event - now you can play this on piano. All of this work is now expanding and is being adapted for string quartets and jazz ensembles. Finally, all of our archive has been transferred to acetate vinyl - this is a way for DJs to perform our archive and spin grooves over the top of this historical work.

The collective has actually had the opportunity to present our work in Edinburgh, Kassell in Germany, in New York, Los Angeles, Auckland, Melbourne and Sydney obviously, and we have just most recently worked with the Krasny Quartet in Moscow and St. Petersburg in Russia. In fact here is the program from the Russian exhibition, with a kangaroo on the piano holding a Malevich painting - here we see Ricky Swallow. What connects all of this work is that it is visual artists’ sound works.

In New York, we had all of this archival material performed over three nights. [Shows various ephemera to the camera].

If it makes a noise we can transcribe it for piano. Look this is where we keep a lot of our research material - look up here we’ve got incredibly obscure and difficult to find records by - a compilation of Dutch Recording Artists. Here is Stuart MacFarlane, the Brisbane artist, I mean this material is incredibly rich for future treatment - the possibilities are endless and limitless. Yet all of this work is a component of the visual artist’s side project - a blind spot on the artist’s practice.

Look here’s a recording from 1996, recorded by David Thomas - as you can see it’s incredibly fantastic clear transparent record - a work of art in itself. 1998 David.M.Thomas , Sydney, well he’s an expressionist, and here he is performing a guitar duet, I think, with Simon Cumming, both visual artists. The music you can hear here will be transcribed for piano.

What is a slave piano?

The one constant in the presentation of this project is the mechanical piano - the slave if you like. The idea is that the musical notation is to be performed on the piano, because a lot of it is impossible for a human to play - even a virtuoso pianist is incapable of performing a lot of this material.

So we’ve devised a computer program, that is able to drive a robot, which sits on top of the keys - if you can think of the pianola, this is a sort of anachronistic prototype which we have used to develop this new equipment.

It’s not essentially our complete idea - we’ve worked with the QRS Pianomation research division, in Florida and they’ve provided some of the hardware.

The computer sits off stage and a disc is inserted, and this robot flays the ebony and ivory of the keys. And it’s actually a question of how much the piano can endure.

Look, you may ask, why the piano? Why not the guitar, why not anything else? Simply throughout history, as a visual metaphor or an icon, the piano appears constantly - right through from Dali to Australian installation artists like Ken Unsworth. So we’ve taken the piano, as a model, as a repository, to return a lot of this sound work to. Clearly the piano musically is a pure form - composers from Bach, Beethoven, Mozart wrote for the piano - so we ourselves have returned this avante garde work to its pure musical state.

Interviewed by Mark Ashkanassy (in 2000).

Art Right Now No. 2, Discovery Media, 2000.

MONA FOMA - PUNKASILA VS SLAVE PIANOS

MONA FOMA - PUNKASILA VS SLAVE PIANOS

Two art collectives - one from Melbourne and one from Yogyakarta, Indonesia - have teamed up to stage The Lepidopters. Based on a comic, it tells the story of an alien moth invasion of the Indonesian archipelago, who plan to colonise Earth through inter-species reproduction. WARP was lucky enough to chat to Punkasila member Uji Handoko Eko Saputro a.k.a. “Hahan”.

Can you tell us a little about collaborating with Slave Pianos? How did it come about?

Once upon a time in 2005, Yogyakarta have one big phenomenon, a extraterrestial phenomenon, it was the landing of a UFO. Then one of the alien, his name Danius, was living four month there. He tried to communicate with people, made conversation and be part of local scene. Then he took seven person from Yogyakarta, students from the art school, for doing kind of world peace music and art project which purposed to save the earth. So that how the project started. After this we have landings in Australia and Cuba and in 2014 we doing another save earth project with Slave Pianos who try to save another earth. Together we will save the energy for good living for human in all earths.

Can you talk about how a comic can become a Science-Fiction Space-Opera?

Comic is maybe part like Ramayana or Bible. So it is like the prophet who writes Bible or Quran to share with another people to concentrate on good things and how to live on earth. We multi-faith and we mystic punk band and we with Slave Pianos and we share the comic together so it can be science fiction space opera. It is possible to be that, why not?

Is the comic itself available to buy?

Just like religion, so everybody can buy for their religion. You can spare money for mosque and church. So more money is more good for religion. Its good for selling this comic to you. The comic tells the truth and secrets for the future. Please buy and you will live better.

It would be interesting to get some context around what it is like to be an artist living and working in Indonesia… what is the art/music scene like in Yogyakarta?

Now, Yogyakarta is again getting popular for UFOs to come. If you look in early 60’s to 70’s is a lot of UFOs coming here. Now, in the early of millennium, there is new trend about UFO coming in Yogyakarta. We think that because aliens maybe interested about gamelan. You know, Yogyakarta is more like tropical island, and the alien is feel bored to going to desert. Alien is become tropical now so Yogyakarta is good place. Indonesia also has open relationship with them, and in Yogyakarta we have visiting program, not only for human, but also for another creatures from space. In Yogyakarta’s art scene, we have alien residency program. Some alien is getting married and have a family in Yogyakarta. Some other, falling in love and take Yogyakartanians to the outer space.

How did The Lepidopters end up on the MOFO program? Are you looking forward to coming to Tasmania for the festival?

We think it is possible for us to going to Tasmania for the festival because we now have one door with parallel dimension, like a Wormhole. So it is more easy for us to go to place we want to go. MONA FOMA is just take 2 or 3 minutes. We will going there, so don’t worry about that. We can meet at MONA FOMA. C u there.

PIP STAFFORD

SLAVE PIANOS & PUNKASILA THE LEPIDOPTERS with MICHAEL KIERAN HARVEY & RACHEL SARASWATI [ID & AUS]

http://slavepianos.org / http://punkasila.com

Thursday Jan 16, 7.15pm & 9.15pm, MAC2 Backspace, Hobart, included in Festival Ticket.

Fairfax/Mark von Schlegell

  • The Saturday Age: Spectrum
  • Questions by Michael Dwyer
  • Answers by Mark von Schlegell, 25 March 2014

Was The Lepidopters commissioned of you or was it an original idea?

Slave Pianos, through Danius, Rohan and Neil, approached me about writing a comic. I had worked with them in the past; they published some of the most experimental writing I’ve ever done. This would be illustrated by an Indonesian from the band Punkasila, perhaps appearing only in Indonesian — in a magazine edited by Helen Hughes, who I already knew and respected very much. I’m not sure they expected the sort of pornographic, Alan Moore style comic script I sent them. Certainly it took so long to draw it never ended up appearing the magazine.

Still, Lepidopters 1 was very fly-by-moment; all I knew was Indonesia and comic in this case. My knowledge of Indonesia was limited, but a visit to the Met in New York and the “Oceania” room convinced me of the centrality of the Moth to this project.

Can you describe your intentions with it?

I knew comics work less well when they are confined to small numbers of pages. I planned a Part 1 of a 3-part series. If SP didn’t want to move forward, it would be interesting as a stand alone, without the other two parts ever actually existing. I decided to make it very “over the top”, implying a nuclear explosion etc. — knowing I probably would never finish the story.

As I investigated Indonesia a bit I noticed the impact of technology and the internet. The sorts of stories that could be told about there from here (I live in Western Europe) today were entirely different from what they were before. I was also noting more and more the phenomenon of young people going about the world chatting on their cell phones. A good number had to be talking to people they didn’t know they were talking to… What the hell was going on? Some kind of invasion? This was one idea that sparked the story of Cheryl.

How did collaboration with illustrator Iwank Celenk work?

Slave Pianos was our go-between. I scripted Part 1, with little idea what was going on. I had written a comic before and read a lot of them (when I first worked with the Slave Pianos in fact I was working as librarian at an art/ design school, in charge of buying comics) so I sent him a rather standard sort of organizational script. I knew him only from the Punkasila videos. He has a lot of charisma, but who knew he would end up drawing what he did? He worked with an interpreter, so got all instructions via translation. That way he was able to make the vision and characters entirely as much his own as mine.

I saw Part 1’s first drawings when I was asked to write 2 and 3, so I was actually inspired by them to develop the comic in the ways I eventually did. The drawings in fact were so good they made everyone (including me) to want Parts 2 and 3 to exist. I wrote Part 2 in upstate New York and there were lots of real moths about. It was hard not to note their interest.

Did you envisage it having a life on stage and did that influence your writing?

When I visited Melbourne I got a sense of the rich theatrical possibilities. Danius introduced me to the actors Richard Piper and Rod Mullinar. So I might have had secret ideas; certainly I did not dissuade the SPs in these directions. But it was their idea and it was only as I was half-way through scripting Part 2 that I heard about the possibilities of stage and opera. I thought immediately of Gilbert and Sullivan, and comics I had seen of Wagner’s Operas etc. I suddenly realized how the story could end. By creating songs and refrains for animals like “Hooray, Hooray! Man has gone away!” I was able in fact to finish the comic as if it was a stage show starring Punkasila. I actually haven’t seen the drawings of Part 3 yet.

Have you seen or had any involvement in production?

No. It all seems unreal. The night it premiered I suddenly found the idea of The Lepidopters opera beginning that same moment in Tasmania utterly bizarre, frankly. I have seen properly scattered and difficult-to-find images that remind me somewhat of the strange and misunderstood performances put on by Raymond Roussel in Paris exactly one hundred years ago. It’s hard for me to believe this is happening.

What do you hope audiences take away from it?

Roussel’s roundly beautiful “bizarre” productions ended up inspiring all sorts of strange developments in art history and culture — including the systems that have brought me and Slave Pianos and Iwank together in this way. As a small number proved able to do in Paris in those days, I do hope some people take away a renewed conviction that anything is actually possible in our arts.

Frankly, I still believe more in the comic than the stage production (which is still indistinguishable for me from a Slave Pianos hoax). So I hope people seek the comic out too….

all the best,
Mark

Slave Pianos, The Lepidopters, Photo

035-050
Photo credit: Selina Ou (NGV)

Slave Pianos, The Lepidopters, Photo

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Photo credit: Selina Ou (NGV)

Slave Pianos, The Lepidopters, Photo

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Photo credit: Selina Ou (NGV)

Slave Pianos, The Lepidopters, Photo

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Photo credit: Selina Ou (NGV)

Slave Pianos, The Lepidopters, Photo

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Photo credit: Selina Ou (NGV)

Slave Pianos, The Lepidopters, Photo

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Photo credit: Selina Ou (NGV)

Slave Pianos, The Lepidopters, Photo

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Photo credit: Selina Ou (NGV)

Slave Pianos, The Lepidopters, Photo

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Photo credit: Selina Ou (NGV)

Slave Pianos, The Lepidopters, Photo

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Photo credit: Selina Ou (NGV)

SLAVE PIANOS: Contact

SLAVE PIANOS
e: ||@slavepianos.org
w: http://slavepianos.org/
t: +61-(0)3–9328–4836
m: +61-(0)432–532–852
a: 52 Provost St, North Melbourne, 3051, Australia
g: Darren Knight Gallery (http://darrenknightgallery.com/)

SLAVE PIANOS: Bibliography

Robert Adlington. “Taking soundings: music, non-music and SLAVE PIANOS.” In Keller, 2001, pages 7–15.

Glenn Barkley. Multiplicity: prints and multiples from the collections of the Museum of Contemporary Art and the University of Wollongong [Exhibition catalogue]. Museum of Contemporary Art, Sydney, 2006.

Christina Barton, editor. Play On: Serious Muzak. Victoria University of Wellington, 2010. Exhibition catalogue.

Pat Baskett. “Cultural Conquerors.” New Zealand Herald, 22 May 1999. [Review essay].

Nicky Bird. “The Queen is Dead.” Art Monthly, April 1999. [Review essay].

Philip Brophy. “Returning the Gift: Conceptualising Music.” Real Time, 105:37, October-November 2011. [Review essay]. [ http ]

Wendy Carlson. Slave Pianos. In McDonald, July 2000. Catalogue essay.

Joel Crotty. “DeFLOCKEDeD.” The Age, Thursday 24th August 2000. [Review essay].

Adrian Dannatt. “Duchamp and Beuys, Not Debussy and Beethoven.” The Art Newspaper, 99:73, January 2000. [Review essay].

Max Delany, editor. Slave Pianos / PUNKASILA / Pipeline to Oblivion: 3 Projects by Danius Kesminas and Collaborators. Monash University Museum of Art, Melbourne, 2011. [ http ]

David Elliott, editor. The Beauty of Distance: Songs of Survival at the Precarious Age. 17th Biennale of Sydney, 2010.

Juliana Engberg. “Artful Excess: The 17th Biennale of Sydney.” The Monthly, June 2010. [Review essay]. [ http ]

M. Feary and S. Maidment. “Slave to the Rhythm.” CAC INTERVIU, 9/10:30–34, Spring/Summer 2008.

Peter Frank. “Gallery Picks of the Week.” L.A. Weekly, March 17–23, 2000. [Review essay].

Seva Gakkel. Slave Pianos. CEC, St Petersburg, April 2000. Catalogue essay.

Anthony Gardner. “The Same River Twice.” Art & Australia, 46(2):160, Spring 2009. [Review essay].

Adrian Gebers. “Slave Pianos.” adriangebers.com, 2010. [Review essay]. [ http ]

Angela Goddard and Robert Leonard. The Same River Twice. Institute of Modern Art, Brisbane, 2009. Exhibition catalogue.

Paul Griffiths. “What’s in the Title? Perhaps a Little Fun.” The New York Times, page E5, April 12 2001. [Review essay].

Ulrike Groos, Susanne Titz, et al. Wiederaufnahme = Retake: Dave Allen, Andrea Bowers, Annika Eriksson, Rodney Graham, Christian Marclay, Hans Niehus, Adrian Piper, Slave Pianos : NAK Neuer Aachener Kunstverein, 14. Oktober–2. Dezember 2001. Revolver, Frankfurt an Main, 2001. [Exhibition catalogue.].

Julian Holcroft. “Slave Pianos.” Like Art Magazine, 9, Winter 1999. [Review essay].

Terry Ingram. “Get ready for a big boom in sonic art.” The Australian Financial Review, 17–18 June 2000. [Review essay].

Giovanni Intra. “Slave Artists of the Piano Cult: An Introduction.” In Keller, 2001, pages 37–48.

Simone Jones and Megan Williams. Under the Influence (Art & Music). QUT Art Museum, Brisbane, 2008. Exhibition catalogue.

Christoph Keller, editor. SLAVE PIANOS: A Diagnosis, 1998–2001. Revolver, Frankfurt am Main, 2001.

Eamonn Kelly. “Oh Fluxus, it goes on and on and on.” The Australian, page Arts.12, 25 October 2007. [Review essay]. [ http ]

Rachel Kent. “Pun to paradox: Bas Jan Ader revisited.” Parkett, 75:177–181, 2006. [Review essay]. [ http ]

Stuart Koop. “SLAVE PIANOS.” Art & Text, 75:86, 2001. [Review essay].

Charles LaBelle. “Mike Stevenson and Danius Kesminas.” Frieze, 53:122–123, June-August 2000. [Review essay].

Elizabeth Mahoney. “The Queen is Dead.” Untitled, 19, 1999. [Review essay].

Chris McAuliffe. Mike Stevenson, pages 168–170. Museum Fridericianum, Kassel, 1999. Catalogue essay.

Chris McAuliffe. “Art. Isn’t it the kookiest thing?” The Age, Wednesday 11 July 2001. [Review essay].

John McDonald. “Two Acquisitions.” Art Monthly Australia, 126:10–11, December 1999.

John McDonald, editor. Uncommon World: Aspects of Contemporary Australian Art. National Gallery of Australia, Canberra, July 2000. Exhibition catalogue.

Shelley McSpedden. “Critical Mass: Cultural Conduits, Translations and Provocations.” Eyeline, 75, 2011. [Review essay]. [ http ]

Vanessa Muller. “Wie Klavierspielen im Dschangel.” Der Tagesspiegel, February 5 1999. [Review essay].

Robert Nelson. “Punk Rocking the Old Order.” The Age, page 19, 1st June 2011. [Review essay]. [ .html ]

Stephen O’Connell. “Slave Pianos.” Art/Text, 67:92, 1999. [Review essay].

Clive O’Connell. “Enthusiasm no substitute for gravity.” The Age, Monday 25 June 2001. [Review essay].

Justin Paton. “Frequent Flyers: Toi Toi Toi in Auckland.” Art New Zealand, 92, Spring 1999. [Review essay].

Mark Pennings. “The Same River Twice.” Eyeline, 69:63–67, 2009. [Review essay].

Jeff Pressing. “A Long Tale with Many Notes.” The Age, 18th July 2000. [Review essay].

Kathleen Rahn and Susanne Titz. “Slave Pianos.” In Wiederaufnahme-Retake [20]. Catalogue essay.

Dylan Rainforth. “Slave Pianos / Punkasila / Pipeline To Oblivion: Three Projects by Danius Kesminas and Collaborators.” Un Magazine, 5(2):30–35, 2011. [Review essay]. [ .pdf ]

Graham Ramsay. Melbourne, Glasgow, Edinburgh. Unknown, 1999. Catalogue essay.

Alistair Riddell. “From the lip: myth, word, aesthetic recycling.” RealTime, 44:42, 2001. [Review essay].

Tom Rivard. “Things Of Desire: Art, architecture and the (pre) occupation of space.” Architecture Australia, September-October 2010. [Review essay].

Dan Rule. “Slave Pianos, PUNKASILA, Pipeline to Oblivion at MUMA.” Broadsheet, 13th May 2011. [Review essay]. [ http ]

Astrit Schmidt-Burkhardt. Maciunas’ Learning Machines: From Art History to a Chronology of Fluxus. Springer Verlag Gmbh, Austria, 2nd revised and enlarged edition, 2011.

Susan Shineberg. “Meet the Wonderful Weird Guys in their Orange Jumpsuits.” The Age, page 2, 20th October 2007. [Review essay]. [ .html ]

Peter Simpson. “A German view of Kiwi Art.” Sunday Star Times, June 1999. [Review essay].

Slave Pianos. Non-Objective Brass: Five Works for Brass Choir. National Gallery of Australia, Canberra, 2000. Printed programme for a concert on Wednesday 26th July 2000 at the Australian National Gallery, Canberra.

Slave Pianos. The Broccoli Maestro: A Chamber Opera in Two Acts, for Six Voices, Six Players and Tape. Chamber Made Opera, North Melbourne, 2001. Printed programme, including libretto, for concerts on Friday 22 and Saturday 23 June 2001, North Melbourne Town Hall.

Slave Pianos. The Strange Voyage of Bas Jan Ader: Ein Hörspiel in einem Akt, für 6 Sänger, 6 Instrumentalisten und Audioeinspielung. Neuer Aachener Kunstverein, 2001. Printed programme, including libretto, for concerts on Sunday 14 and Tuesday 16 October 2001 at the Klangbrücke, Aachen and the Malkasten, Düsseldorf.

Slave Pianos. Foreign Knowledge: A Documentary Monodrama for Soprano, Narrator, Chorus, Computer Operated Piano and Tape Machine. Künstlerhaus Bethanien / The University of Ballarat, Berlin / Ballarat, 2002. Printed programme, including libretto, for a concert on Friday September 27, 2002 at the Old Courthouse Building, Ballarat.

Slave Pianos. Dissident Consonances; or The Iron Curtain, The Flux-Labyrinth & Lithuanian House; or Chairman George Maciunas & President Vytautas Landsbergis. Astra Chamber Music Society, North Melbourne, 2007. Printed programme, including libretto, for concerts on Saturday 26 & Sunday 27 May 2007, Lithuanian House, North Melbourne.

Slave Pianos. “The Gift - Redaction and Decontamination.” Discipline, 1:110–112, Winter 2011. [ .html ]

Sebastian Smee. “Slave to the Music.” Sydney Morning Herald, 10th August 1999. [Review essay].

Mitch Spee. “The Voyage, or Three Years at Sea: Part II.” Frieze, 145, March 2012. [Review essay]. [ http ]

Petra Stegmann, editor. Fluxus East: Fluxus Networks in Central Eastern Europe. Kunstlerhaus Bethanien, Berlin, 2007. Exhibition catalogue.

Eleonora Triguboff, editor. Current Contemporary Art from Australia and New Zealand. Art & Australia, Sydney, 2008.

Rachel Watts. “Sound Suspension: Slave Pianos.” Broadsheet, 39(2):116–119, June 2010. [Review essay].

Penny Webb. “Clouds mostly hot air second time around.” The Age, page 21, 24 October 2007. [Review essay]. [ .html ]

John C. Welchman. “To come out touching nothing but a piano, or Coding Down.” In Delany 2011, page 101.

Stephen Zagala. Afterglow: performance art and photography [Exhibition catalogue]. Monash Gallery of Art, Wheelers Hill, January 2011. [ http ]

Bronius Zumeris. “From the lip.” Beat Magazine, Wednesday 27 June 2001. [Review essay].

Mark von Schlegell. “Slave Pianos.” Flash Art, 33(212):117–118, May-June 2000. [Review essay].

Mark von Schlegell. “A Schema and Historo-Materialist Pro-gnostic.” In Keller, 2001, pages 17–35.

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