Slave Pianos, Sedulur Gamelan/Gamelan Sisters, Model

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Slave Pianos, Sedulur Gamelan/Gamelan Sisters, Model

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Slave Pianos, Sedulur Gamelan/Gamelan Sisters, Model

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Slave Pianos, Sedulur Gamelan/Gamelan Sisters, Model

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Slave Pianos, Sedulur Gamelan/Gamelan Sisters, Model

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Slave Pianos, Sedulur Gamelan/Gamelan Sisters, Model

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Slave Pianos, Sedulur Gamelan/Gamelan Sisters, Model

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Slave Pianos, Sedulur Gamelan/Gamelan Sisters, Diagram

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Slave Pianos, Sedulur Gamelan/Gamelan Sisters, Diagram

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Slave Pianos, Sedulur Gamelan/Gamelan Sisters, Diagram

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Slave Pianos, Sedulur Gamelan/Gamelan Sisters, Detail

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Slave Pianos, Sedulur Gamelan/Gamelan Sisters, Detail

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Slave Pianos, Sedulur Gamelan/Gamelan Sisters, Detail

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Slave Pianos, Sedulur Gamelan/Gamelan Sisters, Detail

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Slave Pianos, Sedulur Gamelan/Gamelan Sisters, Detail

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Slave Pianos, Sedulur Gamelan/Gamelan Sisters, Detail

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Slave Pianos, Sedulur Gamelan/Gamelan Sisters, Detail

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Slave Pianos, Sedulur Gamelan/Gamelan Sisters, Detail

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National Gallery of Victoria: Wall Label

SLAVE PIANOS, Melbourne
Australia est. 1998

Rohan DRAPE
born Australia 1975

Neil KELLY
born Australia 1957

Antanas KESMINAS
born Lithuania 1936, arrived Australia 1949

Danius KESMINAS
born Australia 1966

David NELSON
born England 1967, arrived Australia 1967

Michael STEVENSON
born New Zealand 1964, lived in Australia 1995–2000, Germany 2000–

Gamelan Sisters (Sedulur Gamelan)
2013

mountain ash, guilded meranti, mild steel, brass, copper, acrylic, printed film, cotton, paint, varnish, electronics, solenoids, LEDs

Courtesy Darren Knight Gallery, Sydney


Gamelan Sisters (Sedulur Gamelan) 2013 is an interactive work featuring two interlocking wooden structures that reconfigure elements of traditional Javanese architecture through De Stijl philosophical principles of neoplasticism, creating an abstraction of an 18th century double grand piano. The two cases house 56 Gamelan instruments from Yogyakarta that have been automated to function as a self-governing electro-mechanical orchestra performing musical transcriptions of drawings by American artist Robert Smithson. Visitors can select works to be performed by pressing the gilded triangles on the hexagonal console, which references Smithson’s 1968 sculpture Gyrostasis.